In a different state

January 7, 2014, Chobe National Park – Vic Falls (Zimbabwe)

Today we drove out of Chobe NP. On the way out we saw fife Sable Antelops. When we got to the border of zimbabwe it was not so hard to get across as we had expected. To get to Victoria falls we had to drive through a nationl Park. When we were two minuts in Zimbabwe we got a fine of twenty US$. When we were driving we saw three elephents. Two men were feding them. They alowed us to feed the mom. She had a little baby cald Lucy. She was very plaful. I think she was the strongest baby I have ever seen. At camp we saw the spray of the Victoria falls.

Moritz

Vic Falls - Matopos01

Moment with a monitor

Lucy Baby

Lucy Baby

January 8, 2014, Vic Falls

We are duly impressed by the Falls and the Zambezi River deep down in ist gorge. The drop of 100m and more sends water spirits into the air, dancing around us, drenching us, chasing us along the rim oft he cliffs; sending shivers down our spines.

Prices are also impressive in Vic Falls, apparently throughout Zimbabwe – seeing the Falls costs us over 100 US$, every meal, every service, anything we would like to buy seems to empty our pockets immediately. While the idea of lots of black guys and ladies carting whities from one adventure to the next (bunge, river rafting, helicopter tour etc.) while pulling dollars out of their pockets seems funny, life for Zimbabweans is hardly affordable.

Not having one’s own currency also poses some difficulties: US dollar bills are used, but not the coins. Instead of cents, we get Rand or Pula (at the daily exchange rate) for change, or sometimes just a donut or (at the post office) a pen.

Kathrin

 

The Falls

The Falls

Vic Falls - Matopos04

magnificent peek

Water spirits

Meeting the water spirits

January 9, 2014, Vic Falls – Hwange National Park (Masuma Hide)

In the morning, I did with Nina Zipline.m First, we went on a long one which was very exciting. The more we did, the less exciting it got. Number 5 was the scariest.

After that we went to a new camp, and we didn’t have to put up the tent again but we could sleep in the hide. We saw hippos, elephants and one crocodile. The hippos spashed in the water and opened their mouths wide. At night we heard elephants munching right next to us. Then it was morning and my dad and Moritz heard a lion roar.

Matti

The zippers

The zippers

zip-zip-away!

zip-zip-away!

zooped

zooped

front row food

front row food

peaceful sleep

peaceful sleep

 

January 10, 2014, Hwange Nationa Park (Main Camp)

After an early breakfast we started for the main camp which was 100 km away. At one of the other hides we met someone who told us about a lion kill on the other side of the camp. Ofcourse we went to look, but we hadn’t understud where exactly it was, so we circeled the area but managed to miss it. On the way back there was a car standing by the kill. There was only one leg left and because none of the lions wanted to stay in the sun and protect it from the vultures they just dragged the leg off.

In the camp we took a house because it started to rain. We did some school and in the evening we wached Jurassic Park.

Nina

 

frog pops for breakfast

frog pops for breakfast

ribs for lunch

ribs for lunch

a party at tea

a party at tea

school for supper

school for supper

January 11, 2014, Hwange Main Camp – Bulawayo

Between Hwange Town and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe seems an empty country. Two or three villages in beautiful pastoral settings whizz by, and we are reminded of the nature of our journey.

Looking at this blog, we see ourselves in our tourist character, smiling and enjoying amazing places, driving from one fascinating bubble to the next scenic bubble. (Roads so far are in surprisingly good shape, refuting our European expectations.) Our everyday life, doing the dishes, finding access to Internet, to groceries and places to stay and wash our clothes, playing and watching soccer, has gently installed itself after 4 weeks/4000 km. We all feel comfortable driving the long stretches, reading books or keeping secrets from the parents. It feels very different from the hovering interest in foreign countries we know from holidays. We are travellers, not explorers; the growing physical distance to Cape Town, the approach of our home, Switzerland, in our conversations, thoughts and hearts show us that time and route are just as important as all the exotic experiences. As a family, we are on our way home, travelling through nature, villages and empty spaces; we are on the road.

The latest bubble: UNESCO World Heritage Site Khami ruins, where the Matabele king resided 600 years ago, traded Chinese and Arab goods with the travellers of his time. We are impressed  and reminded of the Ticino, of the Knebelburg in Biel and Parzival, my current bedtime story.

Kathrin

 

African Deli - and yes, those are Mopane worms

African Deli – and yes, those are Mopane worms

stairway to the king

stairway to the king

Vic Falls - Matopos17

planning my veggie terraces

soccer - or what?

soccer – or what?

January 12, 2014, Matopo National Park (Bulawayo)

Today we went to see the best Bushman droings in southern Africa. But to get there we had to hike for two hours. In a book it said that on the way there were two other Bushman droings and a ten thausend years old oven. We found one droing and the oven, but we did not find the second droing. Then it started raining and we were all wet. Suddenly, there were lots of stinging nettles. Then we came onto open grassland and looked for the cave. But we got lost and had to go back, befor the park closed. On the way back we saw the second droings. So we never saw the best Bushman droings of Southern Africa.

Moritz

hiking the Matopos

hiking the Matopos

art critics at work

art critics at work

hiking on whalebacks

walking on whalebacks

wet from the rain

rainshower

beautifully lost

beautifully lost

 

 

 

 

 

Dieser Beitrag wurde unter Traveling in Africa abgelegt und mit , , , , , , , , verschlagwortet. Setze ein Lesezeichen auf den Permalink.

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s